What’s the Difference Between EASA-PPL & the LAPL?

It can be confusing when you’re starting out as a student pilot. Hopefully this post will clarify one big question: “What’s the difference between the PPL and LAPL?”


Training


► EASA LAPL

30 hours flight training, 6 hours solo of which 3 hours must be cross country.

► EASA PPL

45 hours flight training, 10 hours solo of which 5 hours must be cross country.


Cross Country Qualifier


► EASA LAPL

80nm landing at one aerodrome different than departure.

► EASA PPL

150nm landing at two aerodromes different than departure.


Priviliges


► EASA LAPL

PIC without passengers until 10 hrs PIC since to 2000kg with max 4 PoB (incl. pilot), licence issue has been gained, then PIC with for which a Class Rating is held. Passengers on single engined land planes or TMGs of up to 2000kg with max 4 PoB (incl. pilot).

► EASA PPL

Holders of PPL (A) are to act without remuneration as PIC or co-pilot on aeroplanes or TMGS engaged in non-commercial operations.

Notwithstanding the paragraph above, the holder of a PPL(A) with instructor or examiner privileges is allowed to be paid for the:

  • Provision of flight instruction for the LAPL(A) or PPL(A).
    • Conducting of skill tests and proficiency checks for these licences.
    • Instruction of ratings and certificates attached to these licences.

Limitations


► EASA LAPL

VFR Day/Night (if qualified) EU airspace only. Weather minima VFR in sight of surface 1.5km visibility outside controlled airspace or 5km in class C,D,E airspace

► EASA PPL

VFR Day/Night (if qualified) EU airspace and abroad e.g. USA, Australia etc. VFR in sight of surface 1.5km visibility outside controlled airspace or 5km in class C, D, E airspace.


Validity


► EASA LAPL

Non Expiring Lifetime License

► EASA PPL

Non Expiring Lifetime License


If you’re looking for more detailed information on what either licence entails, I recommend reading posts from our Start Flying section of the Sky Blog. Specifically: